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Read in 2017

January:
1. London: the Novel, by Edward Rutherfurd
2. Notes from a Small Island, by Bill Bryson
3. A Very English Scandal, by John Preston
4. Imagined London, by Anna Quindlen
5. The Black Dahlia, by James Ellroy
6. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote

February
1. Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen
2. The Girls of Slender Means, by Muriel Spark
3. Patience, by John Coates
4. Into the Whirlwind, by Eugenia Ginzburg
5. The Turn of the Screw, by Henry James
6. Few Eggs and No Oranges, by Vere Hodgson
7. Vittoria Cottage, by DE Stevenson

March:
1. The Exiles Return, by Elizabeth de Waal
2. Northanger Abbey, by Jane Austen
3. The Death of the Heart, by Elizabeth Bowen
4. The Buccaneers, by Edith Wharton
5. The Death of the Heart, by Elizabeth Bowen
6. White Teeth, by Zadie Smith

April:
1. The Heat of the Day, by Elizabeth Bowen
2. The Two Mrs. Abbotts, by DE Stevenson
3. The Road to Little Dribbling, by Bill Bryson

May:
1. London War Notes, by Mollie Panter-Downes
2. Malory Towers Collection 1-3, by Enid Blyton
3. Famous Five, Collection 1-3, by Enid Blyton
4. Heat Lightning, by Helen Hull

June:
1. The Wicked Boy, by Kate Summerscale
2. The Essex Serpent, by Kate Parry
3. All the Missing Girls, by Megan Miranda
4. Gone girl, by Gillian Flynn
5.  The Passenger, by Lisa Lutz
6. The Couple Next Door, by Shari LaPena
7. The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware
8. The Famous Five Collection 2, by Enid Blyton
9. The Kind Worth Killing, by Peter Swanson

July:
1. Dark Places, by Gillian Flynn
2. The Girls, by Emma Cline

Comments

Marianne said…
I am so envious that it's not even the end of January and you've already read five books!

I just saw that the last book you read was IN COLD BLOOD, which I read in December.

Unknown said…
Dear Ellis,

I am the founder of #HelpAfricanAlbinos and personally write to you kindly requesting your support because you, as an Amazon Vine Voice Reviewer, are a person who I believe can make a difference.

I would like to draw your attention to a new novel, “Then She Was Born” that also forms part of an international human rights campaign which has been endorsed by Pope Francis, the Dalai Lama and eleven Nobel Peace laureates who lent their voices and who each read aloud a different sentence of the novel, recording a video message and being pictured alongside the official hashtag #HelpAfricanAlbinos.

“The She Was Born” is an independently published work of fiction that meets the same standards as books published by mainstream publishers. You are an Amazon Top reviewer and your honest (but not mandatory) review of the book would allow this story and the reality faced by many to become noticed. This suspenseful novel is a true page-turner and I hope that will grab you by both arms and won’t let go until you’re winded, exhausted, and begging for a conclusion.

The e-book is published through Amazon KPD select (free for Kindle Unlimited and Prime) but if you prefer I can send it to you as a gift. There is no obligation of a review.

It would be my pleasure, if you agree, to mention your name in the e-book in the “thanks” section and your review, if you have a blog, will be showed on the official website campaign (HelpAfricanAlbinos.com) with a link attached.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your understanding and time with this important matter.

With my best regards,

Cristiano
Cristiano@HelpAfricanAlbinos.com
Link to Kindle: https://goo.gl/TzPko3
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Nadia Adams said…
I recently came across your blog post titled "Read in 2017," and I must say, I am thoroughly impressed by the diverse selection of books you managed to explore that year. Your reviews are insightful and offer a great balance of critique and personal reflection, making it a joy to read.
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