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2016 Reading

January:
1. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair
2. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum
3. The Awakening, by Kate Chopin
4. Liar: A Memoir, by Rob Roberge

February:
1. The Forsyte Saga, by John Galsworthy
2. Girl in the Woods, by Aspen Matis
3. She Left Me the Gun, by Emma Brockes
4. Because of the Lockwoods, by Dorothy Whipple
5. The Chronology of Water, by Lidia Yuknavitch
6. To Show and to Tell, by Philip Lopate

March:
1. Fierce Attachments, by Vivian Gornick
2. Too Brief a Treat, by Truman Capote
3. On the Move: a Life, by Oliver Sacks
4. The Go-Between, by LP Hartley
5. The Art of Memoir, by Mary Karr
6. Giving Up the Ghost, by Hilary Mantel
7. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou
8. The Great American Bus Ride, by Irma Kurtz
9. An Unquiet Mind, by Kay Radfield Jamison
10. A Widow's Story, by Joyce Carol Oates
11. So Sad Today, by Melissa Broder
12. The Liar's Club, by Mary Karr
13. An American Childhood, by Annie Dillard
14. So Sad Today, by Melissa Broder

April:
1. The Disappearing Spoon, by Sam Kean
2. Girl of the Limberlost, by Gene Stratton-Porter
3. The Sense of Style, by Steven Pinker
4. The Woman Warrior, by Maxine Hong Kingston

May:
1. Underfoot in Show Business, by Helene Hanff
2. Reading Lolita in Tehran, by Azar Nafisi
3. I Am AspienWoman, by Tania Marshall
4. The Clancys of Queens, by Tara Clancy

June:
1. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson
2. The Girl Who Played With Fire, by Stieg Larsson
3. Words on the Move, by John McWhorter
4. The Writing Life, by Annie Dillard
5. Cherry, by Mary Karr
6. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest, by Stieg Larsson

July:
1. Me Talk Pretty One Day, by David Sedaris
2. The Witching Hour, by Anne Rice
3. Unbeaten Tracks in Japan, by Isabella Bird
4. The Crystal Cave, by Mary Stewart
5. Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson

August:
1. We Is Got Him, by Carrie Hagen
2. The Alienist, by Caleb Carr
3. The Cabinet of Curiosities, by Preston & Child
4. The Dragon Scroll, by IJ Parker
5. The Summer Queen, by Elizabeth Chadwick
6. Inheritance: the Story of Knowle, by Robert Sackville-West
7. Bellefleur, by Joyce Carol Oates

September:
1. The Crime at Black Dudley, by Margery Allingham
2. Cathedral of the Sea, by Ildefonso Falcones
3. The Angel of Darkness, by Caleb Carr
4. Death of a Ghost, by Margery Allingham

October:
1. Shogun, by James Clavell
2. Girl on the Train, by Paula Hawkins
3. People Who Eat Darkness, by by Richard Llloyd Parry
4. The Lake House, by Kate Morton
5. The Asylum, by John Harwood
6. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, by JK Rowling

November:
1. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secret, by JK Rowling
2. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, by JK Rowling
3. The Fifth Heart, by Dan Simmons
4. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, by JK Rowling
5. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, by JK Rowling
6. Please Enjoy Your Happiness, by Paul Brinkley

December:
1. Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, by JK Rowling
2. Green Darkness, by Anya Seton
3. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, by JK Rowling

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