Skip to main content

2016 Reading

January:
1. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair
2. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum
3. The Awakening, by Kate Chopin
4. Liar: A Memoir, by Rob Roberge

February:
1. The Forsyte Saga, by John Galsworthy
2. Girl in the Woods, by Aspen Matis
3. She Left Me the Gun, by Emma Brockes
4. Because of the Lockwoods, by Dorothy Whipple
5. The Chronology of Water, by Lidia Yuknavitch
6. To Show and to Tell, by Philip Lopate

March:
1. Fierce Attachments, by Vivian Gornick
2. Too Brief a Treat, by Truman Capote
3. On the Move: a Life, by Oliver Sacks
4. The Go-Between, by LP Hartley
5. The Art of Memoir, by Mary Karr
6. Giving Up the Ghost, by Hilary Mantel
7. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou
8. The Great American Bus Ride, by Irma Kurtz
9. An Unquiet Mind, by Kay Radfield Jamison
10. A Widow's Story, by Joyce Carol Oates
11. So Sad Today, by Melissa Broder
12. The Liar's Club, by Mary Karr
13. An American Childhood, by Annie Dillard
14. So Sad Today, by Melissa Broder

April:
1. The Disappearing Spoon, by Sam Kean
2. Girl of the Limberlost, by Gene Stratton-Porter
3. The Sense of Style, by Steven Pinker
4. The Woman Warrior, by Maxine Hong Kingston

May:
1. Underfoot in Show Business, by Helene Hanff
2. Reading Lolita in Tehran, by Azar Nafisi
3. I Am AspienWoman, by Tania Marshall
4. The Clancys of Queens, by Tara Clancy

June:
1. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson
2. The Girl Who Played With Fire, by Stieg Larsson
3. Words on the Move, by John McWhorter
4. The Writing Life, by Annie Dillard
5. Cherry, by Mary Karr
6. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest, by Stieg Larsson

July:
1. Me Talk Pretty One Day, by David Sedaris
2. The Witching Hour, by Anne Rice
3. Unbeaten Tracks in Japan, by Isabella Bird
4. The Crystal Cave, by Mary Stewart
5. Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson

August:
1. We Is Got Him, by Carrie Hagen
2. The Alienist, by Caleb Carr
3. The Cabinet of Curiosities, by Preston & Child
4. The Dragon Scroll, by IJ Parker
5. The Summer Queen, by Elizabeth Chadwick
6. Inheritance: the Story of Knowle, by Robert Sackville-West
7. Bellefleur, by Joyce Carol Oates

September:
1. The Crime at Black Dudley, by Margery Allingham
2. Cathedral of the Sea, by Ildefonso Falcones
3. The Angel of Darkness, by Caleb Carr
4. Death of a Ghost, by Margery Allingham

October:
1. Shogun, by James Clavell
2. Girl on the Train, by Paula Hawkins
3. People Who Eat Darkness, by by Richard Llloyd Parry
4. The Lake House, by Kate Morton
5. The Asylum, by John Harwood
6. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, by JK Rowling

November:
1. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secret, by JK Rowling
2. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, by JK Rowling
3. The Fifth Heart, by Dan Simmons
4. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, by JK Rowling
5. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, by JK Rowling
6. Please Enjoy Your Happiness, by Paul Brinkley

December:
1. Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, by JK Rowling
2. Green Darkness, by Anya Seton
3. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, by JK Rowling

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Review: Forever Amber, by Kathleen Winsor

Forever Amber takes place in the 1660s, immediately follwing Charles II's ("the Merry Monarch") return of the Stuarts to the English throne. The book features Amber St. Claire, a young woman who starts out as a sixteen-year-old country girl, naieve to the workings of the world. She immediately meets Bruce Carlton, a dashing young Cavalier, with whom she has a passionate love affair in choppy intervals throughout the book. They have two children together, but Bruce won't marry her for the reason he tells his friend Lord Almsbury: that Amber just isn't the kind of woman one marries.

Upon following Bruce to London, he goes to Virginia, leaving her to fend for herself. What follows is a series of affairs and four marriages, with Bruce coming back from America now and then. Amber's marriages are imprudent: her first husband is a gambler, her second is an old dotard, her third locks her up in the house for days and won't let her out; and the last is a fop who a…

Review: This Rough Magic, by Mary Stewart

Pages: 254Original date of publication: 1964My edition: 1964 (William Morrow)Why I decided to read: it was 90 degrees outside at the time and I decided it was time to read another book by a favorite authorHow I acquired my copy: from Susanna Kearsley, December 2009Sometimes, whether or not I decide to read a book depends on the weather. Mary Stewart’s books are best read on either very hot or very cold days; and since it was 90 degrees out one weekend a couple of weeks ago, I decided that this one would be perfect. And it was.This Rough Magic takes its title from The Tempest, a play from which this novel takes off. Lucy Waring is a struggling actress who comes to visit her sister on Corfu. One of her neighbors is a renowned actor who’s taken a bit of a sabbatical and his son, a musician with whom Lucy comes to blows at first. This Rough Magic is vintage Mary Stewart, with a murder or two, a mystery, romance, suspense, and lots of magic thrown in. Lucy is your typical Mary Stewart hero…

Review: Joy in the Morning, by Betty Smith

Pages: 294
Original date of publication: 1963
My edition: 2010 (Harper Perennial)
Why I decided to read:
How I acquired my copy: Barnes and Noble, Phoenix, January 2011


A Tree Grows in Brooklyn is one of my all-time favorite books and I’ve read it, oh, half a dozen times, so I was interested to see how Joy in the Morning would compare.

Set in the late 1920s, Joy in the Morning begins when Annie, aged 18, comes to a small Midwestern college town where her fiancĂ©e, Carl, is in law school. The novel opens with their marriage in the county courthouse, and follows the couple through their first year or so of marriage. It’s a struggle, because Carl and Annie are basically children themselves, for all the ways in which Carl tries to appear more adult-like.

Annie is endearing; she’s ignorant but a voracious reader, reading everything from Babbitt to War and Peace. Betty Smith’s novels are pretty autobiographical; Joy in the Morning is (unofficially) a kind of sequel to A Tree Grows in Brooklyn—cert…