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Giveaway: Cleopatra's Daughter, by Michelle Moran


Somehow, I ended up with multiple copies of Cleopatra's Daughter (basically, I put my fingers in every part of the pie to see if I could score a copy!). So I'm having a giveaway for three copies of this excellent book (in case you didn't enter or didn't win one in one of the other contests floating around the book blogosphere). Two are finished copies and the last is an ARC. You have a week to enter (so basically midnight on the 12th); US only. Good luck! (If you've been living under a rock recently, here's the book's description):

Moran's latest foray into the world of classical history (after The Heretic Queen) centers upon the children of Marc Antony and Cleopatra . After the death of their parents, twins Alexander and Selene and younger brother Ptolemy are in a dangerous position, left to the mercy of their father's greatest rival, Octavian Caesar. However, Caesar does not kill them as expected, but takes the trio to Rome to be paraded as part of his triumphant return and to demonstrate his solidified power. As the twins adapt to life in Rome in the inner circle of Caesar's family, they grow into adulthood ensconced in a web of secrecy, intrigue and constant danger. Told from Selene's perspective, the tale draws readers into the fascinating world of ancient Rome and into the court of Rome's first and most famous emperor. Deftly encompassing enough political history to provide context, Moran never clutters her narrative with extraneous facts. Readers may be frustrated that Selene is more observer than actor, despite the action taking place around her, but historical fiction enthusiasts will delight in this solid installment from a talented name in the genre.

Comments

Michelle said…
I would love to be entered into the drawing! I have been wanting to read this for a while now. I love Michelle Moran. Thanks!
michellekaemarks@gmail.com
Kristen M. said…
I'll go in on this one!
Gayla said…
It would be great to have a copy of this great read :)
Thank you,
Gayla
unfussy2@gmail.com
Linda said…
I read and enjoyed Nefertiti, and have been hoping to win one of Ms. Moran's other novels. Thanks for the giveaway.
lcbrower40(at)gmail(dot)com
I'll throw my hat into the ring on this one too. I just bought The Heretic Queen not too long ago. Michelle Moran came highly recommended.
Oops, forgot to add my email address...

kimm-barnes at hotmail dot com
Irene Yeates said…
Count me in! This is a book I truly wish to read, and it certainly would be nice to win it! Thank you for hosting this giveaway.

cyeates AT nycap DOT rr DOT com
Laura L. said…
I cannot wait to read this one. Thank you for entering me!
laura_carroll99 [at] yahoo [dot] com.
Ashley said…
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ashley said…
I'd love to be entered in this giveaway (I'm sorry for deleting my last comment; I stupidly wrote the wrong email address). Anyway, the email is legxleg at gmail dot com.
teabird said…
Yes, please! Thank you -

teabird17 &&at&& yahoo.com
Mary D
zenrei57 (at) hotmail (dot) com

That is very sweet of you to share your extra copies!! :) It seems like I've been wanting this book forever lol

Please I would love to be entered to win a copy (especially an ARC - those are so fun)

Thank you and have a Safe & Super Labor Day ~
songbirdz said…
Thanks for the giveaway! Michelle Moran is such an awesome author, and I'd love to snag a copy of her newest book =)
lpmccann(at)gmail.com
scarpettajunkie said…
I'd love a copy of Cleopatra's Daughter to while away my days with. Vanduzer1@yahoo.com or http://scarpettajunkie.wordpress.com.
Terry said…
Please enter me in this giveaway - I would love to own this book! Thanks

tmrtini at gmail dot com
Bridget said…
Been reading about this all over the blogosphere! Would love to read it!

Posted about it on Win A Book.
MoziEsm√© said…
Lucky you! I've entered scores of contests and won none yet... I'd love to read this!

janemaritz at yahoo dot com
traveler said…
Thanks for this lovely giveaway. I am very interested in this fascinating novel. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com
Beverly said…
I would love to win this book

beachlover20855[AT]yahoo[DOT]com
Bonnie said…
Please enter my name for the giveaway! Thanks for sharing your extra copies.

redladysreadingroomATgmailDOTcom
RachieG said…
Please enter me!! :) Would love to read it!! :D

rachie2004 AT yahoo (d0t) com
Zia said…
Would love to be entered.

Zia
ziaria(at)gmail(dot)com
Meenoo said…
I would love to be entered into this giveaway. Thank you for offering!
Meenoo (meenoomishra@gmail.com)
I've heard great things about Moran's books and would love a chance to read one.

shhhimreading[at]hotmail[dot]com
Dessert Diva said…
I'd love to be entered to win! I've heard so much about this book, and I really want to read it!

danunepthys(at)hotmail(dot)com
Kaye said…
Everything I have read about this one is glowing, I so want to read the book.

florida982002[at]yahoo.com
Tisa said…
Please count me in the drawing too! ~ :) I would love to read this book. Thanks!

sounders68 @ gmail.com
Please enter me. janemarieprice [at] gmail [dot] com
denise said…
I would love to read this. Please enter me in your drawing.

denise_22315(at)yahoo(dot)com
Marie said…
I would love to read this!

marielay@gmail.com
Michelle said…
Thanks for offering such a great drawing. Please enter me!

mnkaiser123(at)gmail(dot)com

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