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Review: A Dangerous Affair, by Caro Peacock


Book description from Amazon:

Caro Peacock, the acclaimed author of A Foreign Affair, once again ingeniously blends history, suspense, and adventure and returns an endearing and exceptional heroine to the fictional fold.

In Victoria's England, there are perilous intrigues a proper young lady would do well to avoid . . .

Liberty Lane, still in her early twenties, is doing her best to make a new life for herself in London after being bruised by loss and treachery. But there's no chance for her to settle down as a conventional young lady. First, a disturbingly attractive young politician, Benjamin Disraeli, wants her to use her contacts in the theatre world to find out more about a prima ballerina with a notorious love life called Columbine. He hints that some important interests may be at stake. Then Columbine is murdered in her dressing room, after an on-stage brawl with a younger and less successful dancer, who becomes prime suspect. Liberty is at the center of the investigation because one of her dearest friends, Daniel Suter, is convinced of the girl's innocence and will put his own neck in danger to save her. Liberty's determination to save them from the gallows leads her from the upper reaches of the aristocracy to some of London's lowlife haunts, posing the question: How far would you go to save a friend?

I really enjoyed the first Liberty Lane novel, A Foreign Affair. So when I saw that this book was offered through the LT Early Reviewer’s program, I was excited. Well, I didn’t win a copy, but Gwen passed on her copy to me when she was done with it. Usually I’m wary of sequels, afraid that they won’t be as good as the first. Well, I needn’t have worried here; A Dangerous Affair is just as strong as A Foreign Affair. Liberty is jut as spunky and unique as before, and the plot moves along at a brisk pace. My only problem with this novel is the same as I had with its predecessor: the dialogue is a bit too modern, as was our indefatigable protagonist. However, I look forward to reading more of Liberty’s adventures in the future.

Comments

Jennifer said…
I received an ARC of this book, but I haven't read the first one in the series. How important do you think it is to read them in order?
Danielle said…
I'm reading A Dangerous Affair right now and really enjoying it. I agree that in some ways she does seem to be a pretty modern heroine, but the story is so enjoyable I'm willing to overlook it. I also have her new one lined up as well (also tried to get a LT copy, but didn't luck out).
Anonymous said…
I was lucky enough to get a LT ARC (my first!) and I really enjoyed getting reacquainted with Liberty. I love that she has all these really enigmatic men in her life and we really only know about as much about them as she does. I only wish Peacock would let her interact with some female characters that are her equals. Liberty has tons of promise as a series heroine and I look forward to seeing what's next. I think something's scheduled for the later part of '09.
Serena said…
I really enjoyed A Dangerous Affair, which prompted me to read the first in the series.
Anonymous said…
Thanks for the review. I haven't read this ir the first. I'll have to add them to my list.

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