Skip to main content

Read in 2017

January:
1. London: the Novel, by Edward Rutherfurd
2. Notes from a Small Island, by Bill Bryson
3. A Very English Scandal, by John Preston
4. Imagined London, by Anna Quindlen
5. The Black Dahlia, by James Ellroy
6. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote

February
1. Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen
2. The Girls of Slender Means, by Muriel Spark
3. Patience, by John Coates
4. Into the Whirlwind, by Eugenia Ginzburg
5. The Turn of the Screw, by Henry James
6. Few Eggs and No Oranges, by Vere Hodgson
7. Vittoria Cottage, by DE Stevenson

March:
1. The Exiles Return, by Elizabeth de Waal
2. Northanger Abbey, by Jane Austen
3. The Death of the Heart, by Elizabeth Bowen
4. The Buccaneers, by Edith Wharton
5. The Death of the Heart, by Elizabeth Bowen
6. White Teeth, by Zadie Smith

April:
1. The Heat of the Day, by Elizabeth Bowen
2. The Two Mrs. Abbotts, by DE Stevenson
3. The Road to Little Dribbling, by Bill Bryson

May:
1. London War Notes, by Mollie Panter-Downes
2. Malory Towers Collection 1-3, by Enid Blyton
3. Famous Five, Collection 1-3, by Enid Blyton
4. Heat Lightning, by Helen Hull

June:
1. The Wicked Boy, by Kate Summerscale
2. The Essex Serpent, by Kate Parry
3. All the Missing Girls, by Megan Miranda
4. Gone girl, by Gillian Flynn
5.  The Passenger, by Lisa Lutz
6. The Couple Next Door, by Shari LaPena
7. The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware
8. The Famous Five Collection 2, by Enid Blyton
9. The Kind Worth Killing, by Peter Swanson

July:
1. Dark Places, by Gillian Flynn
2. The Girls, by Emma Cline

Comments

Marianne said…
I am so envious that it's not even the end of January and you've already read five books!

I just saw that the last book you read was IN COLD BLOOD, which I read in December.

Dear Ellis,

I am the founder of #HelpAfricanAlbinos and personally write to you kindly requesting your support because you, as an Amazon Vine Voice Reviewer, are a person who I believe can make a difference.

I would like to draw your attention to a new novel, “Then She Was Born” that also forms part of an international human rights campaign which has been endorsed by Pope Francis, the Dalai Lama and eleven Nobel Peace laureates who lent their voices and who each read aloud a different sentence of the novel, recording a video message and being pictured alongside the official hashtag #HelpAfricanAlbinos.

“The She Was Born” is an independently published work of fiction that meets the same standards as books published by mainstream publishers. You are an Amazon Top reviewer and your honest (but not mandatory) review of the book would allow this story and the reality faced by many to become noticed. This suspenseful novel is a true page-turner and I hope that will grab you by both arms and won’t let go until you’re winded, exhausted, and begging for a conclusion.

The e-book is published through Amazon KPD select (free for Kindle Unlimited and Prime) but if you prefer I can send it to you as a gift. There is no obligation of a review.

It would be my pleasure, if you agree, to mention your name in the e-book in the “thanks” section and your review, if you have a blog, will be showed on the official website campaign (HelpAfricanAlbinos.com) with a link attached.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your understanding and time with this important matter.

With my best regards,

Cristiano
Cristiano@HelpAfricanAlbinos.com
Link to Kindle: https://goo.gl/TzPko3
Alexa J said…
A tried-and-true method to get rid of unwanted body fat is to boost the metabolism.
See how at BestMetabolismBoosters.com
I gotta bookmark this website it seems extremely helpful very useful. Thanks for sharing.
clipping path service

Popular posts from this blog

Review: Invitation to the Waltz, by Rosamond Lehmann

Pages: 304Original date of publication: 1931My edition: Why I decided to read: I found this while looking on ebay for Virago Modern ClassicsHow I acquired my copy: bought secondhand on ebayInvitation to the Waltz is one of those coming-of-age-stories. Unlike, for example, The Crowded Street, which focuses on a young woman’s entire coming-of-age experience, Invitation to the Waltz focuses on just one moment in seventeen-year-old Olivia Curtis’s life: a coming-out ball, the seminal moment in the life of any girl of the period (approximately the 1920s). Olivia is neither the most beautiful nor the most vivacious girl at the party, and she’s apprehensive about the evening and all it entails. This is not one of those “high action” books, but it gives a lot of insight into the thoughts and feelings of a girl making the leap into adulthood. I think if I had read this book ten years ago, I would have completely identified with Olivia—she’s shy and retiring, and unsure of herself. Her dress is…

The Sunday Salon

What a crazy week this has been! My cousin, who’s ten, was in town for most of this past week, and since he’s high energy, it’s taken a lot of energy especially out of my mom, who also had to deal with my 87-year-old grandmother. Plus. my sister was in town for the weekend, so it’s been mostly crazy around here. All of my posts this past week have been scheduled; and I only got around to writing a bunch of outstanding reviews yesterday afternoon. It’s quieter here now that my mom has driven my sister back to New York, and I’ve spent much of today catching up on sleep and, of course, reading. Right now I’m reading one of my Virago Modern Classics: The Rising Tide, by Molly Keane (though it was originally published under her pseudonym MJ Farrell). I’m really loving it; the author really knew how to combine wonderful (sometimes exasperating) characters with a great plot. I’ve been cruising Ebay for more books by Molly Keane, since I’m living her writing style. This is easily one of the b…

Read in 2014

January:
1. Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon
2. The Complete Guide to Asperger's Syndrome, by Tony Attwood
3. Mozart and the Whale, by Mary and Jerry Newport
4. Handling the Truth, by Beth Kephart
5. Girl, Interrupted, by Susanna Kaysen
6. The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath
7. Them, by Joyce Carol Oates
8. Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys

February:
1. Random Family, by Adrian Nicole LeBlanc
2. I Was Told There'd Be Cake, by Sloane Crosley
3. The Bell Jar, by Sylvia Plath
4. Twilight Sleep, by Edith Wharton
5. Twirling Naked in the Streets, by Jeannie Davide-Rivera
6. Hungry Hill, by Daphne Du Maurier
7. Me, Myself, and Why, by Jennifer Ouilette
8. Lady Chatterley's Lover, by DH Lawrence
9. The Wise Virgins, by Leonard Woolf

March:
1. Out With It, by Katherine Preston
2. Never Have I Ever, by Katie Heaney
3. Look me in the Eye, by John Elder Robison
4. Beyond, the Glass, by Antonia White
5. Atypical, by Jesse Saperstein
6. The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox, by Maggie O'Far…